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Vamana Purana

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In this book of stories from the Vamana Purana you will find many stories you had not read in other literatures, and you will find many interesting details in stories you...

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Description

In this book of stories from the Vamana Purana you will find many stories you had not read in other literatures, and you will find many interesting details in stories you had previously read elsewhere. Because this is the Vamana Purana, it naturally relates the history of the incarnation of Lord Vamana. In fact, the story of Lord Vamana is related several times, and each time a different aspect of the pastime is dwelt upon. Also, because the Lord appears again and again in different ages, there are differences in the descriptions of His pastimes that are interesting to note.

In several places in his purports Srila Prabhupada refers to the narrations of stories in the Vamana Purana.

Examples of this are: “In the Vamana Purana the history of Maharaja Vena and his degradation are fully described. When Maharaja Prthu heard about the hellish condition of his father, Vena, who was suffering from leprosy in the family of a mleccha once brought the former king to Kuruksetra for his purification and relieved him of all sufferings.”

The Vamana Purana describes the glories of Kuruksetra at great length, showing us that it was a very prominent place of pilgrimage since time immemorial. Here is another example of a story from the Vamana Purana referred to by Srila Prabhupada in his purports: “According to the reading matter, either kah or arkah, there are two references in the Puranas. Kah means Brahma, who once became allured by his daughter and began to follow her, which infuriated Siva, who attached Brahma with his trident. Brahmaji fled in fear of his life. As far as arkah is concerned, there is a reference in the Vamana Purana. There was a demon by the name Vidyunmali who was gifted with a glowing golden airplane which traveled to the back of the sun, and night disappeared because of the glowing effulgence of this plane. Thus the sun-god became angry, and with his virulent rays he melted the plane. This enraged Lord Siva. Lord Siva then attached the sun-god, who fled away and at last fell down at Kasi (Varanasi), and the place became famous as Lolarka.”

Another incident related in the Vamana Purana is referred to by Gopi-paranadhana Prabhu in his commentary on Brhad-bhagavatamrta: “This incident is recounted in a number of scriptures, including the Vamana Purana. Once Prahlada took a trip to Naimisaranya to see Lord Pitavasa, the beautiful form of the Supreme Lord. While traveling on the road he met a strange person, who was dressed like an austere renunciant but was carrying a warrior’s bow and arrows. Prahlada assumed from this person’s contradictory attire that he must be some hypocrite abusing the true principles of religion. Therefore Prahlada started a fight with the sannyasi, vowing ‘I swear I shall defeat you!” But even after several days of dueling, Prabhlada could not subdue this adversary. “Early one morning before resuming the battle, Prahlada worshiped his personal Deity. He then saw his opponent standing nearby, wearing the same garland he had just offered the Deity. Prahlada suddenly recognized that the strange was Lord Pitavasa, Narayana Himself. Thereupon, offering prayers to that opponent with all the competence at his command, Prahlada tried to satisfy Him. In response, the Lord touched him with His lotus hand, which relieved Prahlada from the fatigue of fighting and from all anxiety. Prahlada asked Lord Pitavasa what to do about having transgressed the duty of a ksatriya by having made a promise-namely to defeat his opponent-and not having fulfilled it. The Lord. Fully satisfied by the sport of fighting with Prahlada, told him, ‘But I am always defeated by you!”

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